Kenya

Why Choose Kenya for a Wildlife Safari?

Along with Tanzania, Kenya is the most popular destination to see the wildebeest migration which collects in the Maasai Mara National Reserve July through September.

But Kenya also suffers from a reputation for budget safaris by minivan in an overly commercialized Maasai Mara. As for all travel destinations, you must know where to go. Private conservancies with tented camps of excellent standards are the best options for the Mara area. The added benefit of remaining outside the national reserve in a private conservancy is that walking safaris are possible.


Laikipia, Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks

The Laikipia Plateau in the north provides additional walking opportunities or camel safaris with the Samburu people. Amboseli National Park with its dramatic backdrop of Mount Kilimanjaro is a renowned site of elephant research. West and East Tsavo National Parks are one of the largest elephant habitats on the continent.

MTT recommends six to ten day itineraries which include at least four of Kenya's highlights. For example, Nairobi; the Rift Valley (Navaisha); Amboseli National Park; and the Mara National Reserve. Or, as another example, Nairobi; West Tsavo National Park; Amboseli National Park; and the Mara National Reserve. With more time, you can add a stop in Laikipia such as the Sweetwater's Game Reserve and Chimpanzee Sanctuary. Kenya itineraries often include travel by air as well as by road.


Nairobi

Nairobi, for all its traffic gridlock, remains the safari hub with the most things to do. A must-see destination in Nairobi is the Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage. Become a donor of the orphanage and earn the privilege of joining other foster parents at special visiting hours.


Kenyan Culture

Kenya has at least 40 different ethnic African groups, among them the colourful Maasai, Samburu and Turkana peoples. The Lamu archipelago on Kenya's east coast rivals Tanzania's Zanzibar for an education in Swahili culture.